The AVAS would love to post your bird photos here!

Please email to AVAS@avaudubon.org with the Subject Member's Photos

If you would like to add details, you can follow the following format:

Photographer:Species: If knownLocation: Camera:Story behind the shot


Photographer:

Don Bennett

Species:

Verdin

Location: Prime Desert Woodlands Preserve


Photographer: Carol Collins

Species:

Eurasian Collared Dove

Location: New Zealand Bird Park


Photographer:

Carol Collins

Species:

Mourning Dove

Location:

Butterbredt Spring



Photographer:

Don Bennett

Species:

Costa's Hummingbird

Location: Prime Desert Woodlands Preserve

Photographer:

Don Bennett

Species:

Great Horned Owl and Common Raven

Location: Prime Desert Woodlands Preserve


2020 Audubon Photography Award Winner

source

Category: Professional

Species: Double-crested Cormorant

Location: Los Islotes, Mexico

Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II with Tokina 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 AT-X 107 DX AF Fisheye lens; 1/640 second at f/6.3; ISO 320


Story Behind the Shot: I’ve spent many hours underwater at this California sea lion rookery in the Bay of La Paz, but I had never before encountered diving cormorants there. Shifting my focus from the playful sea lions, I watched in awe as the cormorants plunged beak-first into the sea to snap at the sardines swimming by. Although I spent a long time admiring these birds, I didn’t see a single one catch a fish. Adding insult to injury, curious sea lion pups would zip by the hunting birds and nip at them from behind.


Bird Lore: Cormorants are superb divers, well adapted to rapid pursuit of fish underwater. Their bodies are heavy but streamlined, with dense plumage. When they dive, they hold their wings tightly to their sides, propelling themselves with their powerful legs and webbed feet, steering through the water with their tails. Some cormorants may be capable of diving more than 300 feet below the surface, but most of their hunting is done at shallower depths.